Medical Express

ISSN (print): 2318-8111

ISSN (online): 2358-0429

Author's Articles

14 result(s) for: Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MedicalExpress, new journal, new concepts. Dedicated to the memory of Luis Figueiredo

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(1):1 - EDITORIAL

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Hypertonic saline for treatment of shock: have we looked for everything?

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(1):14-21 - REVIEW

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This review is dedicated to the memory of Luis Poli de Figueiredo, who is responsible for much of what we know about small volume resuscitation. Small volume hypertonic resuscitation was originally based on the concept that a physiologically significant blood volume expansion follows the administration of a comparatively small volume of hypertonic fluid. Because hypertonicity is a physiological vasodilator, its use after severe blood loss induces reperfusion. Previously reported research disclosed a number of additional properties of hypertonic NaCl, amongst them (i) the correction of endothelial and red cell edema with significant consequences in terms of capillary blood flow; (ii) modulation of the immune system, with applications repercussions in the field of sepsis. This review covers developments in this field that occurred from 2005 through 2013. We discuss the discrepancy between animal experiments and human trials, and argue that the basic objective of most multicenter clinical trials may have been based upon a poor strategy.



Keywords: Shock; Hemorrhage; Sepsis Hypertonic saline; Immune circulation.

In the April 2014 issue of MedicalExpress

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(2):53-54 - EDITORIAL

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In the June issue of MedicalExpress

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(3):100 - EDITORIAL

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The October issue of MedicalExpress

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(5):219 - EDITORIAL

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In the December issue of MEDICALEXPRESS

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2014;1(6):289-290 - EDITORIAL

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February 2015: MedicalExpress stands to become a LILACS indexed journal

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2015;2(1):M150101 - EDITORIAL

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MedicalExpress has been visited, downloaded and cited. Publish with us!

Mauricio Rocha e Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2015;2(2):M150201 - EDITORIAL

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MEDICALEXPRESS has been accepted for inclusion in SciELO and LILACS

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2015;2(5):M150507 - EDITORIAL

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Two years seen out: MedicalExpress going stronger than ever

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2015;2(6):M150608 - EDITORIAL

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MedicalExpress Year Three: SciELO and Sports Medicine Highlights

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2016;3(1):M160108 - EDITORIAL

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MedicalExpress: your article online one month after acceptance

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2016;3(2):M160208 - EDITORIAL

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Journal Impact Factors for the year-after the next can be objectively predicted

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS 2016;3(5):M160506 - RAPID COMMUNICATION

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OBJECTIVE: To determine whether trends of Journal Impact factor variation can be objectively predicted for the year after next.
METHOD: Curves for citations/document have been constructed for articles published in the two years previous to the current year (YEAR–1 and YEAR–2) and their citations in the current (unfinished year). Separate curves were constructed for YEAR–1 and YEAR–2. A parameter named INDEX R has been defined. INDEX R was calculated for a randomly selected sample of 100 journals with Impact Factors in the 1 - 3 range.
RESULTS: INDEX R was found to distribute in a quasi-normal manner, with a borderline adherence to the Gauss distribution (0.10 > p > 0.05). A mean value of 0.60 ± 0.19 was observed.
CONCLUSION: As a working hypothesis, it is suggested that INDEX R may indicate a trend for the Impact Factor to occur for the year-after (2017), to be published in the summer of 2018.



Keywords: Impact Factor, bibliometrics, future trends.

Writing good English: is scientific English a Latin language in disguise?

Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

MEDICALEXPRESS - RAPID COMMUNICATION

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BACKGROUND: English is the lingua franca of science; it is the language of the two last world superpowers and the language of four out of the world's ten greatest producers of science; it is a fairly simple language and the most hybridized language in history, with Latin and French contributing 60% of the entire English lexicon. The object of this study is to determine whether the frequency of use of imported words is a function of literary genre.
METHOD: texts were randomly selected from (a) medical scientific original articles, (b) newspaper financial reports, (c) sport reportages, (d) literary texts and (e) colloquial English; for comparison a collection of similarly distributed texts were selected from Portuguese; the frequency of occurrence of Latin or Neo-Latin words was determined in the English texts as well as the occurrence of non-Latin or non-Neo-Latin words in the Portuguese texts; a oneway analysis of variance was used to determine whether significant differences occurred between genres in the two languages.
RESULTS: The frequency of occurrence of Latin/French words in English text was significantly dependent on the literary genre, being maximal in medical scientific texts and minimal in colloquial English; in contrast, the frequency of occurrence of non-Latin words in Portuguese was constant throughout the same literary genres.
CONCLUSION: The use of Latin/French words in English is directly proportional to the complexity of the literary genre, a phenomenon not observed in Portuguese, a typical Neo-Latin language.



Keywords: Medical Education; Scientific language; Ethymology.